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livingwell:challenges [2017/06/12 10:20]
127.0.0.1 external edit
livingwell:challenges [2017/08/08 13:12]
26u8s
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 [Content originally on the Ageing Better Innovation exploration site February 2015](https://​sites.google.com/​a/​mediablends.org/​ageing-better/​challenges) ​ [Content originally on the Ageing Better Innovation exploration site February 2015](https://​sites.google.com/​a/​mediablends.org/​ageing-better/​challenges) ​
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 During the [exploration process for Ageing Better Innovation](https://​sites.google.com/​a/​mediablends.org/​ageing-better/​exploration) we first developed a set of provocations,​ and then distilled some challenges to stimulate development of ideas for action. During the [exploration process for Ageing Better Innovation](https://​sites.google.com/​a/​mediablends.org/​ageing-better/​exploration) we first developed a set of provocations,​ and then distilled some challenges to stimulate development of ideas for action.
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 Here's an initial set of challenges developed from the provocations,​ and from insights gained in reviewing resources: see below for those. ​ Here's an initial set of challenges developed from the provocations,​ and from insights gained in reviewing resources: see below for those. ​
  
-The purpose of the challenges is to stimulate the development of [ideas here](https://​sites.google.com/​a/​mediablends.org/​ageing-better/​ideas-platform) ​>.+The purpose of the challenges is to stimulate the development of [ideas here](https://​sites.google.com/​a/​mediablends.org/​ageing-better/​ideas-platform).
  
 1. Promote greater understanding of ways that technology is changing the world that we all live in 1. Promote greater understanding of ways that technology is changing the world that we all live in
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 1. There isn’t an opt-out from technology - but you can choose how much you participate. (Technology has changed the world dramatically,​ and it will continue to change. What’s important is enabling people to choose how they engage). ​ 1. There isn’t an opt-out from technology - but you can choose how much you participate. (Technology has changed the world dramatically,​ and it will continue to change. What’s important is enabling people to choose how they engage). ​
 +2. Government is concerned that many older people are not online - but there are limits to what government can do. (People will engage with what’s interesting and useful to them, and use devices that most suit their needs).
 +3. Everyone needs Internet access … but beyond that, no one size fits all. (Cost is a barrier, and then personalisation is important).
 +4. Computer courses and basic skills training don’t meet the needs of many older people. (Tablets are much easier to use than computers for most purposes, and smart phones and smart TVs may also meet many people’s needs).
 +5. Simpler interfaces are needed for computers and mobile devices - not just more functions. (Older people should be involved in design).
 +6. Relatively few organisations in the ageing field are actively engaged in the online world or using collaborative tools. (Using social technology should help enable greater greater cooperation).
 +7. Digital social innovations in services are not scaling. (There’s too much focus on the tech, and not enough on what it does, together with a lot of re-invention).
 +8. There is a raft of research, but little knowledge-sharing of that and day-to-day practice. (A lot of research is hidden and not transferred to practice. A culture of competitive tendering reduces people’s inclination to cooperate and use what’s already available).
 +9. The energy for change lies with apps, connectors and storytellers. (To which we can add, evolution of trusted technologies such as TVs. Bring the storytellers together).
 +10. The digital divide is no longer a useful metaphor. Reality is more complex.
  
-2. Government is concerned that many older people are not online - but there are limits to what government can do. (People will engage with what’s interesting and useful to them, and use devices that most suit their needs). ​ 
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-3. Everyone needs Internet access … but beyond that, no one size fits all. (Cost is a barrier, and then personalisation is important). ​ 
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-4. Computer courses and basic skills training don’t meet the needs of many older people. (Tablets are much easier to use than computers for most purposes, and smart phones and smart TVs may also meet many people’s needs). ​ 
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-5. Simpler interfaces are needed for computers and mobile devices - not just more functions. (Older people should be involved in design). ​ 
- 
-6. Relatively few organisations in the ageing field are actively engaged in the online world or using collaborative tools. (Using social technology should help enable greater greater cooperation). ​ 
- 
-7. Digital social innovations in services are not scaling. (There’s too much focus on the tech, and not enough on what it does, together with a lot of re-invention). ​ 
  
-8. There is a raft of research, but little knowledge-sharing of that and day-to-day practice. (A lot of research is hidden and not transferred to practice. A culture of competitive tendering reduces people’s inclination to cooperate and use what’s already available).  +### Resources - what we already have and know
-  +
-9. The energy for change lies with apps, connectors and storytellers. (To which we can add, evolution of trusted technologies such as TVs. Bring the storytellers together).  +
-  +
-10. The digital divide is no longer a useful metaphor. Reality is more complex.  +
-  +
-### Resources - what we already have and know +
  
-Here’s some insights from an initial review of publications,​ research programmes, funding challenges and online resources. [More detail here](/​livingwell/​resources) ​+Here’s some insights from an initial review of publications,​ research programmes, funding challenges and online resources. [More detail here](/​livingwell/​resources)
  
-* A wide range of research studies have shown the potential for the personal use of technology for a better later life, enhancement of services, and routes to greater digital inclusion.  +* A wide range of research studies have shown the potential for the personal use of technology for a better later life, enhancement of services, and routes to greater digital inclusion. 
-* Innovation funders like Nominet Trust and NESTA have supported development of a wide range of projects, and frameworks to inform further development. ​+* Innovation funders like Nominet Trust and NESTA have supported development of a wide range of projects, and frameworks to inform further development.
 * However, it is difficult for practitioners to find and/or translate this innovative work into practice. ​ * However, it is difficult for practitioners to find and/or translate this innovative work into practice. ​
-* General policy reviews to inform development make little reference to digital innovation. Nor does the Big Lottery Fund’s £82 million Ageing Better programme. ​+* General policy reviews to inform development make little reference to digital innovation. Nor does the Big Lottery Fund’s £82 million Ageing Better programme.
 * While agencies may promote their programmes and research, what’s lacking is good signposting,​ collaboration between agencies, and conversations to make the most of the assets that we have. * While agencies may promote their programmes and research, what’s lacking is good signposting,​ collaboration between agencies, and conversations to make the most of the assets that we have.
  
livingwell/challenges.txt · Last modified: 2017/08/08 13:12 by 26u8s